Learn Why Immunizations Matter

Immunizations help protect us from dangerous diseases.

Watching your child get a shot at the pediatrician’s office is never fun, but those vaccines are serving an important purpose. Vaccines, or immunizations, are the reason that many once-common infectious diseases like polio, measles and smallpox have been eliminated. By reducing the spread of those and other deadly diseases, immunizations have literally saved millions of lives.

How Immunizations Work

An infection occurs when germs like bacteria or viruses invade your body and multiply. Babies are born without immune systems that help fight infection, but vaccines work with the body’s natural defenses to help safely develop immunity to disease.

You may be wondering how immunizations work. When it’s time to get an immunization, a weakened form of the disease germ is injected into the body. The body then makes antibodies to help fight off these germs. These antibodies will return if the real disease ever attacks the body, destroying the germs.

Don’t Skip Your Vaccines

Vaccines aren’t just for children—you never outgrown the need for vaccines! Many immunizations are also recommended for adults. The need for these vaccines is determined by a variety of factors like your age, lifestyle factors, locations of travel and risk for developing certain conditions.

Do you need to find a physician to ensure that your immunizations are current? Consult Denton Regional Medical Center’s Find a Physician tool or call 1-855-477-DRMC for a physician referral. Learn more about Denton Regional and the services we offer here.

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